HOWTOs

This page contains a set of short informal recipes to help you solve common challenges you may face when using RTI Connext DDS. This recipes include topics such as configuring favorite IDE to work with our libraries, tuning the performance of your application, or configuring your firewall to let DDS traffic through.

You can contribute by commenting on existing HOWTOs or creating your own here (requires logging in).

In this HOWTO we show how to optimize the serialized size of your data type. Note that this a useful optimization if you have limited bandwidth, but is not necessary for the majority of systems.
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This document explains how DDS works with multiple NICs and the controls that users have.
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You can use Eclipse to debug a live Routing Service instance that is running a Java Adapter. This HOWTO describes what settings to use to allow the java debugger to attach to the RS runtime.
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The purpose of this document is to describe how to use Eclipse to develop C/C++ Connext DDS applications. We will create a simple DDS application using rtiddsgen, set up and Eclipse project to build the application, and finally run it within the IDE.
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This HOWTO describes the steps you need to follow to set up your machine to build DDS applications able to run on a Raspberry Pi. We will use a cross-compiler that can be run on a 32- or 64-bit Linux machine, but we will also provide some links with documentation to cross-compile from different platforms
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This HOWTO applies to the "classic" C and C++ API to the OMG Data Distribution Service (DDS) in which the data-types used to hold sequences were defined as specialized containers. This is needed for C and in the case of C++ was done to comply with IDL to language mappings that proceeded the use of the standard template library.
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There are various strategies that can be used to have DDS applications communicate between each other despite the fact that one or more of these applications are protected by a firewall. This HOWTO focuses in the situation where there is a desire to use static configuration (i.e. manually open specific ports or multicast addresses in the firewall) and the applications are protected with Firewalls but are not behind Network Address Translators (NATs).
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